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Multi-Sensor Cameras: The PTZ Camera Killer

Multi-Sensor Cameras: The PTZ Camera Killer

When it comes to maximizing the coverage of your surveillance system, Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) cameras were once ideal. They reduced the number of cameras required by allowing you to adjust the field of view as needed to cover your home, business or event space. However, this design has limitations. The most critical issue facing PTZ cameras is that while you can move the camera, you still have massive blind spots until the camera is moved. Not to mention compensating for movement while the camera pans or tilts. Even with advanced detection features, multiple angles of coverage and video processing improvements, there’s still the chance you might miss an important incident or event. Multi-sensor cameras change all of this By incorporating four separate sensors in a single housing, you have all of the benefits of a PTZ camera with none of the response time issues or need for adjustment. Simply set each of the four sensors to suit your exact needs, angles and coverage zones. A camera is only as valuable as the video it captures. With multi-sensor cameras, you’re essentially getting to value of four cameras in a single device! There’s no worries about missing an event as all four sensors are in continuous use. Many will also interface with popular video software as single panoramic or composite shot—meaning less licensing fees and easier monitoring. Instead of scouring multiple shots for events, you’re presented with a single field of view. Need to zoom in to see finer detail? The sensor for the field of view you need will take over allowing all of the clarity and ease-of-use of a PTZ... read more
H.265: Unparalleled Quality with Less Bandwidth

H.265: Unparalleled Quality with Less Bandwidth

Today’s video surveillance and security systems require more and more detail to provide convictable evidence and maximum return on investment. As camera and display technologies continue to evolve, how video is encoded and stored stayed relatively stagnant. While H.264 revolutionized video encoding—offering previously impossible compression rates without sacrificing clarity—it simply isn’t ideal for today’s ultra-high-definition cameras and NVRs. Even if you only need 1080p video captures, this new technology offers undeniable benefits. View: Bristol CT – security camera installation – recent examples by Mammoth Surveillance. Consider the following example: If you have 50 cameras across your business, each recording at 4Mbps using H.264—roughly 1080p on many popular camera models—you are capturing approximately 62TB of video per month. Current market prices for reputable 4TB surveillance-grade hard disk drives start around $140. If you need to retain this video for later reference, you’re looking at more than $2,000 per month in storage expansion costs alone. Not to mention there’s the hassle of storing the drives, clearing data when it’s time to recommission them and keeping track of what data is stored where! Systems capable of utilizing the new H.265 codec capture the same level of detail with half the data requirements. In this example, that means you’d only need 31TB of storage per month—saving nearly $1,000 per month without sacrificing video quality or features. In fact, many new H.265 camera models offer exceptional low-light performance and better overall detail than H.264 models from the same manufacturer. All of this also means that IP cameras using H.265 can stream video with less bandwidth. This makes it easier to deploy remote cameras on limited... read more
The Do’s and Don’t’s of Using Fisheye Cameras for Surveillance

The Do’s and Don’t’s of Using Fisheye Cameras for Surveillance

When placed and used properly, fisheye cameras will increase the situational awareness provided by your surveillance system and ensure comprehensive coverage of your home, office or place of business. However, when not placed properly and configured for optimal use within the environment, fisheye cameras offer less than stellar results. In fact, you might even find you were better off with your previous camera arrangement! In our previous guides, we’ve covered the differences between fisheye cameras and multi-sensor cameras and what to look for in a fisheye camera. In the last part of this guide, we’re going to provide best practices for getting the most out of your camera and point out common pitfalls to avoid. Let’s get started! Improving Situational Awareness with Fisheye Cameras One of the most common misconceptions about these cameras is that they’ll allow you to replace multiple other cameras across your surveillance network. While this might be true, we don’t recommend relying on fisheye cameras as your sole camera type. While fisheye cameras provide a wide field of view, they aren’t ideal for depth of field. With the warped images created by cameras, they can also prove tricky for constant monitoring or picking out fine details. In most cases, we recommend using fisheye cameras to provide an overview of your area while using megapixel cameras to capture fine details or further distances. Using fisheye cameras to detect a potential event and megapixel cameras to identify, you are eliminating the weaknesses of both camera types and creating a powerful synergy. Maximizing Capture Potential with Proper Fisheye Camera Placement Due to their shallow depth of field and... read more
What to Look for in a Fisheye Camera

What to Look for in a Fisheye Camera

In the first part of this series, we covered the differences between fisheye cameras and multi-sensor cameras. In this guide, we’ll go over choosing a fisheye camera to suit your needs. From ensuring great image quality to what to look for to ensure a high-quality camera design, you’ll know everything you need to know about using these innovative imaging solutions to protect your home or property. The Megapixel Debate One of the first things to consider will be video quality. When looking for a fisheye lens, it’s important to remember that the megapixel rating on the camera will likely be higher than the megapixels of the video captured. This is because the shape of fisheye lenses creates a round video while camera sensors are square or rectangular. Pixel loss can reach as high as 50%. After dewarping the image, select regions of the field of view might limit megapixels further still. For this reason, we highly recommend going to at least 5 megapixels. If you’re using it as primary camera source instead of an overview in support of additional cameras, higher megapixels will help to ensure that you can pull identifying information and convictable evidence from all corners of the feed without issues. View some of our CCTV security camera installations in West Hartford HERE On-camera vs Client-based Dewarping One of the most important features for any fisheye camera is a good way of dewarping images. This helps to correct perspective and make video from your fisheye camera easier to scan. It will also help to pick out details should you need to create copies of footage after an... read more